State of Aquatics 2012

Recorded June 18, 2012

Description:

On June 28, 2012 we hosted an aquatic safety webinar. We invited our customers to attend this conversation because we had already seen two severe aquatic incidents within the first three weeks of the summer. We wanted to get a message out quickly, to help protect kids for the rest of the summer. The webinar presented our protocol to protect non-swimmers: Test. Mark. Protect.

Panelists:

Watch the recording

View the slides


Webinar Content

Drowning Injury Chart

This chart includes unconscious aquatic submersion incidents between 2008 and 2012. It shows the victim age and the depth of water where victim was rescued. All incidents required some form of resuscitation (CPR, rescue breaths, AED, oxygen, or other). And all medical events and incidents involving victims older than 18 were removed.

Practice Photo 1

Use this photo as practice to help your lifeguards identify unprotected swimmers. Hear our observations in the recorded webinar, and tell us what else you found in the comments section below.

Practice Photo 2

Use this photo as practice to help your lifeguards identify unprotected swimmers. Hear our observations in the recorded webinar, and tell us what else you found in the comments section below.

Test. Mark. Protect.

The Redwoods recommended aquatic safety plan, for all pool and waterfront use is:

For all children entering the water, including all children and adults that are part of an outside group (rentals, special events, birthday parties, etc.):

Test: Swim test to determine swimming ability. Users who do not take the test, or children under 7 years old, may be automatically designated as non-swimmers.

Mark: Clearly mark all users to identify swimming ability.

Protect: Most aquatic incidents happen in shallow water (3'-5'). Protect non-swimmers, especially younger children, by restricting them to the shallow end and adding additional layers of protection…

  1. The non-swimmer is actively engaged in a swim lesson or activity with staff;
  2. The non-swimmer is actively supervised, within arms reach of an adult parent or caregiver; or
  3. The non-swimmer is wearing a properly fitted US Coast Guard approved Life Jacket.

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